Setting Our Intentions

This morning I realized that next Saturday will be June 1st. June 1st represents the beginning of the last six months of the year. The thought helped to refocus my thinking back onto my yearly goals. With the rigamarole of everyday life, it’s only natural to lose focus on our life goals.

I thought this post would be an opportune time to set my intentions for the bottom half of 2013. I woke up journalling. I have set three goals for myself. If you’ve read this blog for any length of time, you can probably guess what they are. I’d like to take this opportunity to encourage us all to set a vision for the end of 2013. Visualize how you want to enter 2014. The goal is to be dreaming a bigger dream entering into 2014.

until next Sunday,

lillieth

P.S. On this Memorial Day weekend, I’d like to thank the 1% of the U.S. population that makes the commitment to serve our country in the Armed Forces. This link to the Huffington Post http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/25/memorial-day-2013-history_n_3328298.html has statistics on how many people serving in the Armed Forces have died in active duty since the founding of this country.

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Growing Pains

Here lately I’ve been fixated on changes needed to live my best life ever. In the Follow Your Bliss post, I wrote about the challenges some Generation Xers are having coping with the economic demands of today. My remedy was for us to follow our bliss. In the 20th century there was an ongoing battle to expand and redefine who was allowed to have the best of life, i.e. the women’s rights movement, the Civil Rights’ movement. People tired of narrow definitions of who was allowed to have the American Dream. Throughout the 20th century there have been people who championed for everyday people realizing their dreams. Self-help gurus such as Napoleon Hill, Stephen Covey, Norman Vincent Peale, Iyanla Vanzant, Deepak Chopra, and Dennis Kimbro are examples of people who worked/ and are still working to help us redefine what is possible in our lives. In the 90s I believe the spiritual transition to believe you can have your heart’s desire culminated with Oprah’s Change Your Life series.

The growing pain some of us Generation Xers have is making the transition from what I perceive as the 20th century way of thinking in which once we reach adulthood we are a finished product; to the 21st century way of thinking in which we are all works in progress. We have to realize we can’t allow our skill set to become outdated assuming that what we learned in college is all we ever need to know. We have to approach our lives as if it’s a science experiment in which we are constantly researching ways to improve our lives. We, Generation Xers, can successfully navigate these changes if we accept the inevitability of change and stay current.

I hope my thoughts in this post are not too “all over the place”. These are just streams of thought I’ve been mulling over for the past few months. Thanks for reading.

Until next Sunday,

lillieth

Mother’s Day Thoughts

I searched for a poem about Mother’s Day to no avail, so I chose a poem with sentiments I would think mothers would wish for their children.

If

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too:
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim,
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same:.
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and build’em up with worn-out tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings,
And never breathe a word about your loss:
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much:
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

Rudyard Kipling
 
Until next Sunday,
lillieth

Why?

This week I’m reading the book The American Way of Eating by Tracie McMillan.  It’s an exposé of the American food system. It’s a first person account of the author’s travails working in the fields as a farmworker in California, a stocker at Walmart in Michigan, and at Appleby’s in Brooklyn. The book has been eye-opening in expected and unexpected ways.

“And anyone slogging through the depths of our economy on minimum wage or less, whatever their job, knows that their survival depends less on their own individual fortitude than the community of people they’re able to draw around them for support.” p. 234

This quote articulates an answer to a question I have gotten a few times: Why do you want to open a natural food store in the black community in Houston, Texas? The quote implies that we are meant to be our brothers keepers, and to whom much is given much is required. It gave me words to explain why the location of the store is as important as the contents of the store.

Don’t you love when reasons are given to you for questions you did not know you didn’t have the answer too! 🙂

Until next Sunday,

lillieth